In the beginning…

mgStellenbosch1In the beginning of 2011 my grandfather gave me his 1968 MG midget MK III. The car is still in almost perfect condition as can be seen in the photo taken in Stellenbosch. I will dedicate this part of my webpage to give updates on my MG. The bottom photo shows my grandmother and grandfather playing bowls.

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Upgrading to APM2.5…

Upgraded to the APM 2.5. Height and GPS accuracy are significantly better than the APM 1.0. The APM 2.5 also has a much higher telemetry data throughput due to some of the signal processing happening off of the Atmel chip. Below is a photo of the much more neat setup containing the APM 2.5.

APM 2.5 setup

APM 2.5 setup

Stellenbosch from above…

After receiving my raspberry pi camera I thought it to be a good idea to to take some aerial photos with the quadcopter. The first few photos are from Stellenbosch University campus followed by the last few which are from my girlfriends farm near Worcester.

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First diffraction measurement with fEMu

After getting the quadcopter to fly in loiter and auto missions with confidence it was decided to use the quad copter for what it was originally intended for. To measure RF signal propagation. This measurement was done with a transmitter on one side of a 13m high man made berm and flying a vertical path up to 50m on the far side measuring the diffraction of the continuous wave signal at 400MHz. Below is a video with the payload strapped to the quadcopter, note that the antenna (yellow block) was exchanged for a small stub antenna at the actual measurement. The measurement was done using my RS232 spectrum analyser logging onto a Raspberry Pi. The effect of the quad copter on the antenna pattern was ignored and the measured data was treated as relative. The measured data can be seen below and clearly resembles a diffraction pattern. This pattern has been verified against some prediction code of a colleague. As a first test this proved very successful as a proof of concept and was hereafter named fEMu (flying Electromagnetic Metrology unit).

Measurement on upward and downward flight

Measurement on upward and downward flight